HANGOVER? THESE IDEAS CAN HELP

by Cat on January 1, 2013

The best way to avoid a hangover is to limit your drinking the night before or you could try eating a few bananas before you hit the bar. The potassium in the banana and its complex carbohydrates has a rehydrating and coating effect on the intestines, helping you recover faster from the alcohol excess.

Another pre-hangover helper is water. If you drink one glass of water for every glass of alcohol, you will be much less likely to suffer severe effects–and you will to busy heading to the bathroom to drink too much! But if you are reading this, it’s probably too late for those cures.

Assuming you are battling a hangover, water is still one of the best cures. Much of the resulting problems come from the fact that alcohol dries you out and you need to rehydrate yourself.

Orange juice is among the commonest of home remedies for hangovers. It performs the function of rehydration with great intensity and the Vitamin C acts as a counter to that nauseous feeling. You can combine this with boiled or scrambled eggs and lightly toasted bread. The protein from eggs helps the liver to filter the toxins of alcohol faster while toast has a charcoal-like effect, preventing bloating or vomiting caused by alcohol.

Another idea that worked for me recently is ginger tea. Just a couple of slices of fresh ginger steeped in hot water is all it takes to alleviate that typical head-splitting feeling induced by hangovers, and it helps the stomach digest the alcohol better without suffering cramps.

If you want something that’s like medicine, use any granulated antacid that you can easily consume by just pouring it in a glass and letting it fizz. This eases the body ache caused by hangover. Most antacids contain some form of sodium bicarbonate that helps to neutralize the excessive acidity caused by consuming too much alcohol.

Hope you feel better fast!

For more cures, follow this link.

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HERE’S TO THE NEW YEAR–WITH BUBBLES

by Cat on December 31, 2012

If there is any night during the year that is appropriate for Champagne or some other sparkling wine, it’s tonight–New Year’s Eve! The only catch is that it can sometimes be tricky to open. Here are some tips.

Start with a bottle that’s as cold as possible – no one likes warm bubbles. If you need to chill a bottle quickly, instead of just putting it on ice, put it on ice that has been heavily salted or in an ice water bath; these methods can chill a bottle completely in 15-30 minutes.

Once you have your cold bottle ready to go, proceed by carefully removing the foil and the wire cage – no need to rush this. It’s a good idea to keep the bottle pointed away from you (and others) from this point on, just in case the cork decides to rocket off on its own.

Once you’ve removed the wire cage, put one palm over the cork and hold firmly. With your other hand, grip the bottle and twist the bottle, not the cork, until you hear and feel the cork pop. If that’s too hard on your hands, just put a dishtowel over the cork to give yourself a better grip and prevent the cork escaping right at someone.

Take your time – done correctly, there should be only a slight pop and, most importantly, no loss of Champagne. Just remember, there’s no reason to shake the bottle up, pop the cork, and spray Champagne around – save it for yourself!

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USING A DECANTER TAKES BALLS

December 30, 2012

Using a decanter makes your table (and your wine) look so elegant. It also has the advantage of providing a greater surface for air to reach the wine, pulling up the aroma and opening the taste more rapidly. But decanters can be really difficult to clean. Rinsing with plenty of warm water helps, as does [...]

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ANOTHER DRINK CHOICE FOR NEW YEAR’S

December 29, 2012

If you are not going with the traditional Champagne for the New Year’s party, how about a Spanish Cava? Prices for high quality Spanish Cava are very favorable in comparison to French Champagne or California sparkling wine! The bonus is that you are getting a Spanish wine that, by EU regulations, must be made by [...]

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HOW ABOUT SOMETHING OTHER THAN CHAMPAGNE FOR NEW YEAR’S?

December 28, 2012

To celebrate the New Year, it’s almost mandatory to have something bubbly and sparkling. The tradition choice has been Champagne. One newer and less expensive option is an Italian Prosecco. The Prosecco category, now at more than 1 million cases in the U.S. and growing at around 35% annually, has been one of the hottest [...]

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WINE NEOPHYTE GOES SHOPPING

December 27, 2012

This animated video makes you feel like a real wine expert! (We know it’s not Zin-fan-dell)

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WOMEN VS MEN

December 26, 2012

“Women prefer white wine. Men only drink red. Women like sweet wine. Men purchase less wine.” These are just a few of the common beliefs about men and women and wine, but are they really true? One statistic we can rely on is that US wine consumers are approximately 55% female and 45% male, according [...]

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A TOAST ON THIS SPECIAL DAY

December 25, 2012

May the joys of today be those of tomorrow. The goblets of life hold no dregs of sorrow. To all the days here and after, May they be filled with fond memories, happiness, and laughter.

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CHRISTMAS EVE

December 24, 2012

Christmas Eve is more of a milk and cookies night than a night for wine. It is a family night. A night of anticipation. A night that is all too short for parents of young children. So, we wondered, what is Christmas Eve like in countries that are not traditionally Christian? In Buddhist Japan, Christmas [...]

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FRENCHMEN SKIPPING WINE WITH DINNER

December 23, 2012

According to a survey conducted by FranceAgriMer, an independent agricultural industry observer, the French are now more likely to drink fruit juice than wine at the dinner table. “Fewer than one in five French adults now drink wine almost every day as health concerns and a sluggish economy maintain a long-term pattern of sharply falling [...]

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